Teen Chore Contract

A Chore Chart Alternative

If you are not having much success with teen chores, it might be time to try a teen chore contract.



What's the difference? For starters, a contract can seem more grown-up than a chore chart especially if younger brothers and sisters are using charts. And that might be all the difference you need!

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Why Use a Teen Chore Contract?

The reasons to use a contract are not much different than the reasons for using a chore chart. Each provides a way to track the chore list to make sure things are getting done as well as making sure that everyone agrees on what will be done and when.

But contracts can help even more.

They put into writing nearly all aspects of chores for teen - which is something that chore charts may not do as well. It can be a challenge to put all the parts of chores (how, when, where and consequences of not doing them) on to a chart. But all of those pieces can be put into a contract without much work.

Plus, for teens who want and need more independence, chore contracts are a step toward adulthood. Most contracts are legal documents that teens cannot sign until they are 18. By having a contract that they can sign, they are taking another step in their maturity.



What is a Teen Chore Contract?

Any contract has some basic parts. Those parts need to be adapted for your specific family and teen, but here are the main items.

  • What: Which chores will be done. For starters, check out our teen chores list.
  • When: Timing of the chores. Are they daily? Weekly? Some of both?
  • Where: Where the chores get done. This might all get covered in the "what" section. For example "clean bedroom" is both what and where.
  • Why: Why the teen chores are being done. This could include how much allowance or pay goes with each chore. Or what privileges are earned (or can be taken away) for each one.
  • How: How each chore is to be done. This is where the parent and teen definitions of "clean" can be ironed out.
  • Changes: How changes can be made. Often, the first pass at something isn't the final one. Changes might need to be made to any section and this part of the contract addresses how that gets done.


Additional Teen Chore Resources

The list above can look overwhelming, but it doesn't need to be. You can download a sample completed teen chore contract here.

And if you prefer, check out this blank teen chore contract template which you can use as abasis to create your own contract.

After you've done the basic contract, there can be times that you need to add a chore for a short period of time. But redoing the whole chore contract seems like a bit much for watering the Christmas tree, shoveling the drive when it snow, or raking leaves in the fall. In those cases, a teen chore contract supplement can be exactly what you need.

Still confused or needing some extra help on setting up a teen chore program? Be sure to check out the Teen Chore Success program which includes a great ebook on designing a successful teen chore program plus two great bonuses (for a limited time).

It might just be the help you've been looking for . . .